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What learning looks like this fall

As expected, many things are different this year, but the students who need our help, support and expertise the most are now back in their classrooms and residence halls. Some students are back part-time. Some are staying home and continuing with remote learning on Zoom.

A teacher and student communicate via sign language

As expected, many things are different this year, but the students who need our help, support and expertise the most are now back in their classrooms and residence halls. Some students are back part-time. Some are staying home and continuing with remote learning on Zoom. But all are receiving and benefiting from  learning opportunities as needed. And that means students are still interacting with their friends, peers and teachers, and they’re still connected to and part of the Perkins community.

In the photographs below, you’ll see how excited our students are to be back, and how thrilled our teachers are to once again be working with them.  These snapshots highlight a few ways things are different, yes. But most importantly, they show how Perkins is continuing to deliver personalized education to the kids who need it most.

A young boy walks with his teacher, both are wearing masks.
A young girl walks with her teacher, both are wearing masks.
A teacher communicates with a student using sign language.
A group of students and teachers sit in Dwight Hall.
A student, using a white cane, walks alongside his teacher.
A student works on a computer.
A teacher points to a computer monitor, as a boy looks on.
A student works with classmates over a video conferencing app.
Classroom with three students – and the teacher has 2 more students joining remotely via zoom on her laptop.
A student works on a braille typewriter.
Working on braille typing.
A student communicates with a teacher over a video conferencing app.
Working on a brailler with a teacher who appears on a tablet.
A student pushes a flower cart.

Read more about: Perkins News

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Slater, who is deafblind, types an email to her Aunt Lori. Photo Credit: Anna Miller
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