Rachel Bennett

Assistant Director of CVI Now, Parent Advocacy and Support

About

Rachel is a special education teacher, a leading parent advocate for children with CVI, and a parent of a child with CVI, Henry. Rachel knows what it is like to fight for Henry’s success. She intimately knows the struggles, fears, joys and precious moments of hope that come with raising a child with a complex visual impairment. She works hard to implement a visually accessible day for Henry, including inclusive CVI instructional methodologies, interventions, and adapted materials. Through her learning and advocacy, Rachel gained an in-depth knowledge of CVI and collaborated with families and professionals in the field. In 2018, Rachel presented on CVI and Behavior at the DC/Maryland AER conference and was part of the Family Education and Advocacy panel at the Perkins 2019 CVI Symposium. Rachel was a guest presenter on CVI for George Mason University’s TVI Program. For the past two years, Rachel was the lead content writer for a team of incredible CVI parents and a web developer, who created a new website for the Pediatric CVI Society. Recently, Rachel helped lead an online campaign to motivate the CVI community to respond to the National Eye Institute’s Request for Information about its future strategic plan. As a result, CVI was the single most mentioned issue. Currently, Rachel is part of the first cohort that will soon complete the University of Massachusetts, Boston/Perkins CVI Certificate program. Rachel has worked in education for her entire career. She earned a master’s degree in Special Education from George Washington University. Rachel was a middle school special educator and English teacher for Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) in Maryland. She then joined the MCPS Secondary English Curriculum Office as an Instructional Specialist. In this role, Rachel developed curricula that infused blended and personalized learning, culturally responsive pedagogy and instructional technology to ensure all students experience agency and rigor.