River with rocks flowing through a forest.
Activity

WaterViz STEAM Program: A creative approach to understanding water cycle & climate data

Team up with students from around the country to analyze, interpret and build 3-D scale models of real scientific data!

The Project INSPIRE team is very excited to announce another fun learning activity for U.S. braille readers who are in middle and high school.

We are collaborating with the USDA Forest Service to offer WaterViz: STEAM Program: A Creative Approach to Understanding Water Cycle & Climate Data! This 6 session online program will begin on Saturday, October 14 at 11:30-1:00 PM Eastern / 10:30-noon Central /  9:30-11:00 Mountain / 8:30-10:00 Pacific.

Here is a short overview of the program activities:

All students will receive a t-shirt and certificate of participation.

If you have a student who is a braille reader (or learning to read braille), we ask that you share the attached flyer with them and their family. A parent/guardian will need to complete a brief registration form in order for their child to be considered for the program.

Registration closes Tuesday, October 3. We will notify students if they are or are not selected for the program by the end of the day on Friday, October 6.

Thank you,

Tina Herzberg and the other members of the WaterViz Team

Tina S. Herzberg, Ph.D.

she/her/hers
Professor and Coordinator of Special Education – Visual Impairment Program
USC Upstate; College of Education, Human Performance, and Health; HEC 3039
800 University Way
Spartanburg, SC 29303
Office: 864-503-5572
Fax: 864-503-5574
[email protected]

Visit: Project INSPIRE: Increasing the STEM Potential of Individuals who Read Braille

Use this form to be notified of future Project INSPIRE courses and other activities. 

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