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Webinar

Understanding and connecting with the world

Understanding concepts and being able to access information enables students who are visually impaired to learn and connect with the world around them.

Understanding concepts and being able to access information enables students who are visually impaired to learn and connect with the world around them.

At a young age, children who are low vision, blind or deafblind begin learning concepts like “home” and “job” as part of their compensatory access skills. They also begin exploring different methods of accessing information using literacy skills like braille, large print, audio, sign language, tactile symbols and switches.

Parents can help reinforce concept development and literacy skills at home by taking the time to explain experiences in a meaningful way. 

In this hour-long webinar with Barbara Bamel, you will learn:

Activities for concept development in young children including ways to use chores and sounds to reinforce concepts at home and in nature.
Tips for explaining your child’s experiences in a way that adds meaning and promotes greater understanding.
How to decide whether braille or other literacy skills are appropriate for your child.
Advice for advocating in public schools for adequate concept development and literacy instruction.

Opportunities for Q&A will be provided at the end of the webinar.

Webinar presenter

Barbara Bamel, Teacher of the Visually Impaired

Barbara has worked for 22 years as an itinerant teacher at Perkins School for the Blind, where she’s taught compensatory access skills to students ages 3-21 in public schools throughout greater Boston as well as infants and toddlers as part of early intervention services. She has worked with students of all abilities and frequently consults with public school teachers on the learning needs of students with visual impairment. Barbara has a master’s degree in education with a concentration in visual impairment from Boston College and an undergraduate degree in psychology from Union College.