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Starting early to support your child’s independence through Executive Functioning skills at home and at school

In this video: Executive functioning skills begin to develop early in a child’s life, and include elements such as emotional regulation, task initiation and working memory. Students with strong executive functioning skills often naturally develop them, while other students benefit from explicit instruction.

In this video:

Executive functioning skills begin to develop early in a child’s life, and include elements such as emotional regulation, task initiation and working memory.

Students with strong executive functioning skills often naturally develop them, while other students benefit from explicit instruction. These key skills are often learned incidentally by many children. However, for children with visual impairments, cues may be missed. Being intentionally and explicitly instructed about skills such as time management, organization and categorization can help children gain academic and personal independence in school, at home and throughout life.

Join Leslie Thatcher, Director of College Success@Perkins, and an Executive Functioning coach, to learn how you can support your child now and in the future.

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