Webinar

Parent partnerships: Understanding the visual behaviors of CVI

In this webinar: Each child’s unique Cortical/Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) manifestations are based on the location impacted in the brain, based on how that unique brain learns and rewires and based on the unique visual experiences of that child.

In this webinar:

Each child’s unique Cortical/Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) manifestations are based on the location impacted in the brain, based on how that unique brain learns and rewires and based on the unique visual experiences of that child. Every tool for the accurate assessment of children with CVI depends heavily in parent/caregiver information. Parents hold vital information about their child’s visual skills across the day, across multiple kinds of environments and across their child’s lifetime. This presentation explores that essential partnership and helps illustrate how the parent information supports all the CVI assessment areas.

Presenter

Speaker Q&A

I have a student with congenital zika exposure. I see very clear signs of ocular visual impairment, but not CVI. In addition to myself completing a CVI range, are there specific types of MEDICAL testing we can do to help completely rule out CVI?

We know there are impacts to the visual brain for children with Zika. There are structural abnormalities that are indicative of CVI. For any diagnosis of CVI, I would use several tools: CVI Range and TEACH CVI Screenings (level dependent on the age). These will give you the visual behaviors that are impacted for that child. Also, I have attached three articles here about Zika and CVI.

How can I tell our CVI (who has attended CVI webinars) that an assessment involving only the parent questionnaire is not enough?

In order to understand a child’s visual skills we need four data points: Parent interview (or student interview) in order to understand the improvements to date, to understand the across the day function and to understand the function across different environments. We need observations in familiar places to see how they operate in a place that has context and objects that are better understood. We also need observations in unfamiliar places to understand the child’s visual abilities in new environments with new objects. We need a direct assessment in a highly controlled setting in order to see the child’s absolutely best visual skills and to understand what needs to be adapted to bring that into the learning setting.

All four are essential parts of understanding the child’s functional vision. If you miss part of this protocol, you will miss information about functional vision.

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