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Novel Effect App Review

Bring reading to life with Novel Effect app!

As educators, it is important to make literary experiences as interactive and valuable for the students that we work with. With that in mind, the Novel Effect app does a fantastic job merging reading and layering it with an immersive experience by including accurately timed audio effects that help bring stories to life! 

In the video below, Mat, Novel Effect’s developer, is live reading a story with the Novel Effect app (which adds sound effects) to a preschool class. Mat goes on to explain more about the Novel Effect app.

There are several ways to utilize the app including reading hard cover books as well as eBooks. Educators and students can read a hard copy print (or Braille) version of a story book that is available from the app’s list of books. There is also an option to download eBooks directly within the app and read on the go.  

The Novel Effect app is free. You can download and learn more about the app here:

This first video demonstrates the process of downloading an ebook and how Novel Effects automatically adds and syncs appropriate sound effects that are activated as you live read the story to a student.

The second video demonstrates a live reading of the book with the Novel Effect sounds following the live reader. Listen for the background music and additional sounds that correspond with the story!

There is also an interactive video series.  This video series is available online on a computer and will be available in the future on streaming devices and mobile devices as well.

Want to try Novel Effect? Select your desired book here and read the speech bubbles. Your voice will be in sync with the story and sound effects are activated when you say key words.

What are your thoughts on this app?  How would you use it with your students?

Editor’s Note: APH and Novel Effects have partnered to create sound effects for the tactile book, The Littlest Pumpkin. Learn more in the post, APH’s Littlest Pumpkin Tactile Book and Sound Effects! post.

By Ericka

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