Self-Paced

Ventral Stream Functions in CVI: Object and Face Perception

fMRI image of the brain with ventral stream highlighted
$55

#25 in the CVI for the TVI webinar series

The ventral stream is commonly known as the “what” pathway of perception; these are pathways that carry information related to object form and recognition through the brain. Ventral stream functions, which play a critical role in development and functioning, are frequently impacted in individuals with cortical/cerebral visual impairments.

Dr. Corinna Bauer explains multiple aspects of face and object perception and recognition, as localized to particular regions in the temporal lobe. Through this discussion, participants explore how to determine which aspects are easy and which are challenging for each individual with CVI, in order to better target interventions.

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Dr. Corinna Bauer focuses her research on understanding how the visual dysfunctions observed in cerebral/cortical visual impairment (CVI) relate to brain structure and function. Following a master’s in bioimaging, she completed her doctoral studies in neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine. Currently, she applies advanced MRI techniques to study how the brain adapts to vision loss due to both ocular and cerebral causes. Corinna’s recent work concentrates on the relationship between brain structure and function with performance on assessments of higher-order visual processing in individuals living with cerebral/cortical visual impairment.

Learning Goals and Objectives

Participants will:

  • Describe the functions of the central stream
  • Relate aspects of object recognition to regions of the brain
  • Relate student strengths and challenges to specific educational interventions

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Meet the Presenters

A picture of Corinna Bauer sitting her office wearing her white lab coat
Corinna Bauer, Ph.D.
Instructor in Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School; Investigator (Schepens Eye Research Institute), Massachusetts Eye and Ear
At Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass. Eye and Ear, Dr. Bauer's research focuses on understanding how the visual dysfunctions observed in cortical/cerebral visual impairment (CVI) relate to brain structure and function. During her doctoral studies, she utilized multi-modal neuroimaging techniques in the development of potential biomarkers for monitoring the progression of Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Currently, she applies advanced multimodal MRI techniques to study how the brain adapts vision loss due to both ocular and cerebral causes. Her recent work concentrates on the relationship between brain structure and function with visual processing abilities in individuals living with visual impairment due to early developmental brain damage.
Level:
Introductory
Length:
Approximately one hour
Credits:
1.5 Continuing Education
1.5 Professional Development
1.5 ACVREP
1.5 CTLE
Cost:
$55 - Earn Credits