Perkins Brailler partner celebrates 50th anniversary

Worth Trust employees assembling Perkins Braillers.

WORTH Trust, which trains, employs, educates and provides services for people with disabilities, marked its 50th anniversary with a Golden Jubilee celebration.

September 17, 2014

WORTH Trust, Perkins’ brailler assembly partner in India, recently marked its 50th anniversary with a Golden Jubilee celebration at its Katpadi headquarters.

The charitable organization, which trains, employs, educates and provides services for people with disabilities, will also reach another major milestone in the coming months – the assembly of its 100,000th Perkins Brailler®.

“Perkins is immensely proud of our successful relationship with WORTH Trust,” said David Morgan, vice president and general manager of Perkins Products. “Our hope is that this partnership will continue to evolve, driving increased value to our customers while providing training and employment for people in India with visual impairment and other disabilities.”

Perkins began partnering with WORTH Trust in 1996. The organization employs roughly 300 people with disabilities, including those who are blind and visual impaired.

In August, employees at WORTH Trust assembled 1,200 Perkins Braillers – its highest ever production month. After assembly, the braillers are shipped to the U.S. and then sold in 175 countries across the globe.

“It’s definitely a win-win situation,” said Dan Roy, director of operations at Perkins Products. “We provide WORTH Trust with a revenue stream and a way to help people with disabilities. In return they provide us with a quality service.”

WORTH Trust is one of India’s most respected organizations working to improve the lives of people with disabilities. WORTH stands for Workshop for Rehabilitation and Training of the Handicapped.

In addition to its brailler unit, WORTH Trust manufactures plastics and mobility aids like white canes, walkers, crutches and wheelchairs. It is also the primary distributor of Perkins Braillers in India, selling around 1,000 of the braille-writing machines each year.